Why march?

Think voting rights and 2020

The United States has come a long way in voting rights, yet in 2017 we still have a long way to go:

  • In the early U.S., most states allowed only adult white male property owners to vote. Men without property and women were largely prohibited from voting.
  • By 1856, white men were allowed to vote in all states regardless of property ownership, although requirements for paying tax remained in five states.
  • Later, a series of constitutional amendments established that voting rights cannot be denied or abridged based on the following: "Race, color, or previous condition of servitude" (1870), though this still only applied to men. "On account of sex" (1920). "By reason of failure to pay any poll tax or other tax" (1964). "Who are eighteen years of age or older” (1971).
  • However, until the Civil Rights Movement of the 1960s Jim Crow laws requiring literacy tests, religious tests, and poll taxes were some of the state and local laws used in various parts of the United States to keep Native Americans, non-white citizens, legal immigrants, newly naturalized citizens, and any other locally "undesirable" groups from exercising voting rights granted under the Constitution.


Now project ahead to the next presidential election—our nation's most important democratic process—and unless more states enact the National Popular Vote bill into law between now and then, the votes in a whopping 76% of U.S. states will continue to be politically irrelevant as a result of the "winner-take-all” scheme, which was not part of the Constitution but evolved with the rise of the political parties and their increasing self-interests.


The National Popular Vote March for 2020 will be a shared nationwide moment to raise public awareness about this generally overlooked, large-scale, scandalous voting inequality and to celebrate the commitment of grassroots movements and people from all walks of life to work toward the common good. Will you be there? Will you make it happen? If  yes, you'll participate in nothing less than a paradigm shift in American civic engagement and citizenship.


Almost a century after finally achieving the right to vote women today hold tremendous power in making the National Popular Vote a reality. But we are all in this together regardless of who we are and where we live, because the Interstate Compact underlying the National Popular Vote bill won’t take effect until the participating states reach a combined total of at least 270 electoral votes. As of spring 2017, we have 165.


Even if you live in one of the 12 or so current “battleground” states, your state’s status may change. Battleground designations are not permanent and can move elsewhere over time.


******


MARCH T-SHIRTS:  Please visit this website's online Store or go directly to the external ORDER page: https://store.fiimarketing.com/national_popular_vote_march/shop/home

(To order March for Democracy tees, visit: https://store.fiimarketing.com/the_march_for_democracy/shop/home)

Click this text to start editing. This simple title and text block is great for welcome or explanatory text. When writing, try to keep things down to a few lines at a time. Break up your content into different blocks to keep your page interesting.

Click this text to start editing. This simple title and text block is great for welcome or explanatory text. When writing, try to keep things down to a few lines at a time. Break up your content into different blocks to keep your page interesting.